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    Jackie Villevoye, 62, Designer

    Everybody has a system — a set of processes developed for navigating whatever life throws at them. Jackie Villevoye’s couldn’t be more visceral.
    “The way I do things has always been like this. Purely from the stomach,” says the 62-year-old Dutch designer and founder of fashion and homeware label Jupe by Jackie. “I strongly believe in genes.”
    Although Jackie’s speech is straight-arrowed and frank, characteristic of a pragmatic businesswoman, her designs reveal a completely different flourish to her personality. Her embroidered details embellish and decorate her pieces with a lively and playful elegance.
    “I wanted to bring some humor to it. It’s only fashion in the end of the day,” she says.

    Jupe by Jackie
    Jupe by Jackie

    From Empty Nest to Entrepreneur

    To Villevoye, it might be “only fashion,” but in just under a decade, Jupe by Jackie has won the recognition of some of the fashion scene’s biggest players, enjoying a four-year collaboration with the radical high-fashion brand Comme des Garçons and being stocked in powerhouses such as Lane Crawford Singapore and The Conran Shop.
    Ten years ago, Villevoye couldn’t have envisioned her current success. Her previous years had been filled with the assiduous job of raising of her five children in Breda, in the south of the Netherlands.
    “When Kate [Jackie’s youngest] left home for university I cried for weeks straight looking at the sea and realizing it was all behind me,” she recalls. “Emotions in me are really strong. It felt deep. I felt empty.”

    Jupe by Jackie
    Jupe by Jackie

    Unsatisfied Shopaholic

    While an empty nest might have been her catalyst, her aesthetic sensibility and drive have always been there. “When you have five children, you are automatically a shopaholic!” jokes Villevoye. “It might be clothes or toys or food. You are always buying, buying, buying.”
    But while she shopped, she was consistently disappointed by the selection. She always had been complimented on the way she dressed her children and the decor of her home.  “I knew there was something there,” she says.
    From the start, Villevoye’s intuition has informed her brand more than any business plan ever could. Following a hunch, she bought a solo one-way ticket to India.
    “I told myself I would only come back when I found what I was looking for,” she says. 

    Jupe by Jackie
    Jupe by Jackie

    Traveling the World for Inspiration

    She found it in the province of Uttar Pradesh, where she met the master embroiderers that she has worked with ever since. She had closed the deal with the craftsmen whose work she fell in love with, even before deciding what product she would sell. 
    “ ‘Ties! That can’t be that complicated to make,’ I thought to myself,” Villevoye recalls.
    But like every true entrepreneur, she wanted to do something innovative. She started selling ties for women — a boyish elegance reflected in her own style and inherent in all of Jupe’s designs. A complete newbie in the world of retail, Jackie called TRANOÏ in Paris — one of the most influential and prestigious fashion trade shows — to ask about getting a booth to showcase her ties.

    Jupe by Jackie
    Jupe by Jackie

    Never Taking No for an Answer

    “I got this arrogant Frenchman on the line who told me, ‘No way, I have never heard of you,’” she says.  “But that’s the advantage of being older than the other person. I am determined! I didn’t give up on that phone call; I kept calling and calling and talking and talking.”
    After she learned that there might be available space on the men’s floor of TRANOÏ, Jackie changed her strategy.
    “The next minute I was on the line with India making ties for men!” she says. “That is how I started making ties for men. There was never any business plan. It was always completely organic, just following my nose.”
    Villevoye’s 2010 debut at TRANOÏ opened many doors for Jupe by Jackie. She became a regular fixture on the fashion circuit. Every year her collections expanded, moving from just ties to full menswear and womenswear lines to a separate t-shirt collection. More recently, she has added a housewares collection. It was at TRANOÏ that